Climate and Energy

 
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Leveraging TCFD to Strengthen Your Climate Strategy

Climate change requires urgent action. It’s the next high-impact, high-probability risk facing organizations, and needs to be on the radar of forward-thinking business leaders. Future-proofing an organization requires a strong climate strategy and using the TCFD recommendations to understand and manage climate-related risks and opportunities is a great starting point. This article suggests five questions, aligned with TCFD, to ask when developing a climate strategy.
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Using TCFD to understand and prepare for the impact of climate change on your organization

ESG Acceleration Webinar: TCFD - Beyond Risks and Reporting

The demands for global market participants to progress on climate-related disclosure and transparency are increasing to enable a more resilient world economy. In this webinar, Steve Hather Group Chief Risk Officer at Coca-Cola Hellenic Bottling Company shared more about how they have used TCFD to better understand climate risks and opportunities as part of their inspiring ESG strategy (Mission 2025) and Sam Gill, Principal Climate Change Consultant at SLR Consulting made the case for why TCFD is beneficial, elaborate on the climate risk analysis process and shared some best practice tips.
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How to Develop a Strong Climate Strategy

Companies are facing immense pressure to evolve their business strategy in view of climate change. Indeed, climate-related concerns have increased exponentially in recent years among investors and other stakeholders. Developing a climate strategy entails having a plan to mitigate the company’s impacts on climate change, as well to adapt to the new circumstances arising from climate change. This article outlines the compelling case for having a strong corporate climate strategy in place, and suggests three steps to develop such a strategy together with a downloadable checklist.
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Activating Materiality on Climate Mitigation & Adaptation in Insurance

More than a quarter of the world’s 2,000 largest publicly-traded companies have committed to a net-zero strategy, but do all of these companies have clear action plans in place to deliver on them? Finch & Beak’s forthcoming benchmark study on the European insurance industry dives deeper into how this sector is moving towards decarbonization. A preview of this work will be shared during the upcoming ESG Acceleration Webinar on Tuesday 1 March. The webinar also features a real-life case from Storebrand – the Nordic long-term savings and insurance company that is working to have net-zero greenhouse gas emissions across its investment portfolios by 2050.
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ESG Acceleration Webinar: Preparing for Climate Transition

During this webinar, we considered how corporates can prepare for the transition to a 1.5-degree world. The insurance industry served as an example with real-life cases on climate risk mitigation and adaptation. Guest speaker Marcus Bruns, Nordic Head of Sustainability at Storebrand, presented the company's climate strategy and how Storebrand is working to have net-zero greenhouse gas emissions across its investment portfolios by 2050.
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Register Now for the New ESG Acceleration Webinar Series

Join us for 2022's first instalment of Finch & Beak's ESG Acceleration Webinar series, aimed at speeding up sustainability performance and activating your ESG approach. On 1 and 9 March we'll focus on Climate and ESG and with practical take-aways and real-life cases. Join us as we dive deeper into how to get ready for the Dow Jones Sustainability Index (DJSI) questionnaire and into preparing for climate transition.
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Accelerating the Race to Zero for Steel, Cement, and Construction

Today, the world emits 50 billion tons of CO2 equivalents of greenhouse gases (GHG) each year. As part of this, so-called "harder-to-abate" industries are responsible for 27% of the global CO2-emissions, being the second largest source of GHG emissions. Materials, steel, cement, aluminium, and chemicals are jointly responsible for almost two-thirds of these emissions. Directly affected by the generated emissions in the harder-to-abate industries is the construction industry, which relies on materials like steel and cement. According to the Global Alliance for Building and Construction, the construction industry emits 38% of global energy related CO2-emissions, with the expectation to grow if no urgent actions towards net-zero targets are implemented.
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Introduction of transition-focused changes in the 2022 climate change questionnaire

Publication CDP Scores & A List 2021

CDP has announced companies’ scores to the 2021 assessments will be published on Tuesday the 7th of December 2021. On this day, the not-for-profit organization will also publish its annual A List, showcasing the companies that are leading on environmental transparency and action, based on their annual disclosure through CDP’s climate change, forests and water security questionnaires.
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Science-Based Targets and Carbon Offsetting at the COP26

Taking place in Glasgow from 31 October until 12 November, the COP26 summit brings together global leaders to discuss and agree on ways to accelerate action towards achieving the Paris Agreement and the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change. Ahead of the COP26, close to a thousand businesses committed to setting a net zero target in line with limiting global warming to 1.5ºC above pre-industrial levels.
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Accelerating the Circular Economy in the Port of Rotterdam

At Finch & Beak, we are always curious about the sustainable developments taking place in the cities that we work in, and Rotterdam is one of them. In 2016, a shocking 20% of the national CO2 emissions of the Netherlands was accounted for by the port of Rotterdam. Time to take action: between the period 2016-2020, the port of Rotterdam managed to reduce its CO2 emissions by 27% to 22.4 million tons. A noteworthy reduction that can be explained by the switch to more renewable energy sources and the exploitation of waste-to-value opportunities. The port of Rotterdam is making an impact through discovering the benefits of the circular economy.
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